Top 5 Best Harnesses for Siberian Husky

The Siberian husky is a beautiful dog that has a challenging, free-spirited character.

Whilst the dogs’ striking coat markings and stunning blue eyes make them coveted by prospective pet parents, what many people fail to realize is how difficult it is to train these energetic dogs.

Those who truly understand the Siberian husky know that they are not a breed for the first time owner because unlike other dog breeds, the Siberian husky gives scant concern for pleasing their owner.

This makes motivating them to be obedient a whole lot more difficult.

Thus it becomes even more important than usual to find the best harness for Siberian husky in order to give the pet parent better control.

Quick look: Top 5 Best Harnesses for Siberian Husky in 2017

Added to this is the Siberian huskies’ wanderlust.

These guys love to roam and hate being boxed in, which means they’ll find a way to escape from what would be a secure yard to less determined dogs.

Indeed, it is often said that the Siberian husky put the ‘H’ in Houdini!

This wanderlust and habit of doing their own thing is relevant because a Siberian husky off the leash is liable to disappear into the distance with his pet parents calls falling on deaf ears.

With this in mind we’ll also look at the best dog leash for Siberian husky so that this four-legger with a need for exercise can be kept under control.

All of which means that a Siberian husky is best suited to experienced dog owners who can commit to the obedience training and understand how much exercise these dogs who can run all day need.

To facilitate this you need a good harness and leash, or collar and leash, so the dog is kept safe and yet can exercise energetically.

With this in mind let’s take a look at our top choices for keeping your Siberian husky safe from wandering.

1. Lovinpet No Pull Heavy Duty Harness

The Siberian husky is a sled dog, which means to pull things is in their very DNA.

This is great if you live in an icy wasteland and need a sled pulling, but not so hot when you’re on the other end of the leash in the park.

To take the ‘P’ out of ‘pull’ and add it to ‘pleasant’ you need a no pull harness.

We love this Lovinpet harness for a number of reasons.

Firstly, it does indeed give you the edge on a walk.

Dogs that would pull you along, like a boat does a water-skier, actually walk much better with this harness.

It’s reassuring that it "Does what it says on tin", but what about comfort and fit for the dog?

The harness is adjustable and comes in a great range of sizes.

To ensure you get the correct fit simply measure your dog’s girth and compare it with the chart provided by the manufacturer.

The harness is specifically made for large and strong dogs, and is constructed from tough durable materials that are nevertheless padded and with some ‘give’ for comfort.

A feature we found particularly useful was the grab handle on the back of the harness, for those times when you need to gain control of the dog quickly.

Oh yes, we nearly forgot to mention it – the price is extremely competitive.

2. Ruffwear Every Day Harness

Our next best harness for Siberian husky is this Ruffwear product, described as an everyday harness.

What they mean by this is that it’s extremely functional and will take your from regular walking in the park through to a day’s hike, being equally as comfortable at the end of the day as the start.

Ruffwear’s philosophy is to make dog equipment that allows them to enjoy the great outdoors, so what better recommendation can you get for a Siberian husky?

This Ruffwear harness has a number of features such as a padded breastplate to spread the force of pulling, plus padding to ensure extra comfort.

For the fashionistas amongst you it also comes in an attractive range of colors so there’s something for every taste.

From a practical perspective, this harness is fully adjustable (as you would expect) for a pawfect fit.

We like how it has two leash attachment points: One on the back and one at the front of the breastplate.

This advantage of the latter is that when the dog pulls, their own momentum spins them sideways to face you, thus making pulling not worthwhile.

This is a popular design used by dog trainers for exactly this reason.

This harness isn’t the cheapest on the market and is a considered purchase.

However, it’s reassuring to know that users tell us how their harness looks as new today as the day it was purchased, several weeks ago and will last for a good long time.

3. Mighty Paw Martingale Training Collar

If you have a preference for a collar over a harness, then be sure to choose the best collar for Siberian husky.

Right out it should be said that prong collar or shock collars have no place in humane methods of dog training.

Not only do they cause physical pain but they cause mental confusion, which leads to feelings of insecurity which can manifest itself as aggression in the dog.

Features to look for when seeking a collar for a Siberian husky are:

  • Durable materials
  • Broad so that it doesn’t dig into the neck
  • Gives a ‘cue’ not to pull, when the dog does so

One solution is a martingale collar, of which this Mighty Paw product is our favorite.

It consists of tough, nylon webbing with light-reflective stitching and 100% iron chain.

This collar has two D-ring attachment options.

Depending which one you attach the lead to it can be either a training collar (with cinch action) or a standard non-cinch collar.

The advantage of this martingale collar is that when the dog pulls, the chain tightens slightly.

The idea is not to choke the dog, as happens with the more severe choke chain, but to tell the dog he’s pulling.

At no point can the collar become so tight as to strangle the dog, so you have the peace of mind of knowing he’s safe but at the same time receiving the feedback he needs about unwanted pulling behavior.

Full marks to Mighty Paw for fusing function and good looks with the handy training collar.

4. Sarah Hodgson Light Longline

You’ve got a great collar so now you need the best leash for Siberian husky.

Let’s share with you a little secret: Get a longline leash!

OK, much like we dislike prong collars, it has to be said we feel the same about flexileads.

Throw them away! They teach the dog to pull, by rewarding him with freedom when he does so.

They also give you little or no control over the dog.

A longline, however, is a completely different beast.

It allows the dog to roam.

You can recall him, and if he fails to obey simply reel him in.

Another great advantage is that if he runs off suddenly, just put your foot on the line and he stops in his tracks.

We selected this Sarah Hodgson longline because it’s super long at 50 ft (most standard longlines are around 32-33 feet long) and yet very light.

This allows the dog a better feeling of freedom because he isn’t aware of the weight of the line connecting him to you.

On a practical level it’s also light enough to pack into a rucksack and not weight you down, so there’s no reason to not take it with you.

Use a longline a few times and you’ll wonder how you ever managed without one.

Your dog can play fetch and romp around without the constant worry of him disappearing over the hill.

The added bonus is that freedom helps him burn off energy, which means a tired dog less likely to get up to mischief.

5. Leash Boss No Pull Double Handle Training Leash

Last but not least, whether you opt for a collar or a harness, there will be times when your Siberian husky tries to tow you along like a sled through snow.

Anyone who has experienced the discomfort of the leash whipping through your hand and causing leash-burn will appreciate the genius of this Leash Boss product.

Made with heavy pullers in mind, the leash is made from extra durable materials and has a 5- year guarantee against fair wear and tear.

It’s a tad longer, at five foot, than a standard lead, specifically with large dogs or pullers in mind.

It also has not one, but two, proper padded handles for maximum control.

One handle is at the end of the leash in the standard place, whilst the other is closer to the clip for when you need to keep tighter control of the dog.

Owning a Siberian husky is a challenge that means balancing their need for exercise with an insatiable wanderlust.

An ordinary collar and lead is going to leave you with leash burn, a wrenched shoulder, and quite possibly a lost dog.

However, when you choose wisely the correct harness or collar, combined with a longline or leash that gives you a double grip is going to put you back in control.

The ironic thing is that when you can get the dog out for exercise, he’ll burn off energy, which makes him easier to control.

Start your own circle of better behavior by getting your dog out and about and thereby meeting his needs.

You won’t regret it and you’ll find yourself having the sort of happy relaxed relationship with your dog that you craved in the first place.

Good luck and happy walking!

About the Author Sarah Robinson

Dr Sarah Robinson attended veterinary school at Oklahoma State University receiving a D.V.M. in 2008. Sarah’s longtime interest is to help people to better communicate with their pet companions, and in doing so, to help them to strengthen their relationships with their dogs and cats. Sarah has published numerous articles on canine feeding in pet related magazines, veterinary journals and leading natural health web sites.

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